flytofight:

Grumman TBM Avenger missing 1/3 of its wing after taking fire over Chichi Jima.
In the book “Flyboys” by James Bradley, the U.S Navy bombing raids on Chichi Jima were covered extensively.  In the photo above, Lt. Bob Kings avenger was hit by anti aircraft fire.  Losing control of his aircraft, he ordered his crew to bail out, while he was attempting to bail out himself, the aircraft righted itself and control was gained back.  The crew members were never recovered and Lt. King was devastated at the loss of his crew.  Although a tragic story, this photo represents the extremely rugged and reliable design of U.S Naval aircraft of the period.   

flytofight:

Grumman TBM Avenger missing 1/3 of its wing after taking fire over Chichi Jima.

In the book “Flyboys” by James Bradley, the U.S Navy bombing raids on Chichi Jima were covered extensively.  In the photo above, Lt. Bob Kings avenger was hit by anti aircraft fire.  Losing control of his aircraft, he ordered his crew to bail out, while he was attempting to bail out himself, the aircraft righted itself and control was gained back.  The crew members were never recovered and Lt. King was devastated at the loss of his crew.  Although a tragic story, this photo represents the extremely rugged and reliable design of U.S Naval aircraft of the period.   

Reblogged from aerohistory

todayinhistory:

September 1st 1983: Korean Air Lines Flight 007 shot down

On this day in 1983 the Korean Air Lines Flight 007 from New York City to Seoul was shot down by a Soviet jet fighter over the Sea of Japan. All 269 passengers and crew aboard the flight were killed, leaving no survivors; the majority of the victims were South Koreans. Flight 007 was off course and strayed into Soviet airspace, which was on high alert due to the presence of a US reconnaissance plane that resembled a Boeing 747 aircraft. Soviet pilot Major Gennadi Osipovich was responsible for the attack, and despite privately suspecting it might be a civilian jet, fired a heat-seeking missile at the plane which caused it to crash into the ocean. Occurring in the middle of the Cold War, the incident increased tensions between the world’s two leading superpowers - the United States and the Soviet Union. In what US President Ronald Reagan called a “massacre”, among the 269 victims was a US Congressman from Georgia. This incident has been much discussed recently due to the shooting down of Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 over Ukraine on July 17th 2014.

Reblogged from todayinhistory

flytofight:

Stunning photographs by LIFE photographer Frank Scherschel of a Vought OS2U Kingfisher scout plane.

The OS2U was used on battleships and heavy cruisers for scouting purposes.  It would catapult off the side of the ship, land in the water, and was craned back onto the ship.

These photographs were taken aboard the battleship North Carolina (BB-55) during atlantic convoy patrols in early 1942.

Reblogged from ww2aviation

sketchymetal:

In its original configuration, designated the Ju 52/1m, the Ju 52 was a single-engined aircraft, powered by either a BMW or Junkers liquid-cooled engine. However, the single-engine model was underpowered, and after seven prototypes had been completed, all subsequent Ju 52s were built with three radial engines as the Ju 52/3m (drei motoren - “three engines”). Originally powered by three Pratt & Whitney Hornet radial engines, later production models mainly received 574 kW (770 hp) BMW 132 engines, a licence-built refinement of the Pratt & Whitney design. – Wikipedia

sketchymetal:

In its original configuration, designated the Ju 52/1m, the Ju 52 was a single-engined aircraft, powered by either a BMW or Junkers liquid-cooled engine. However, the single-engine model was underpowered, and after seven prototypes had been completed, all subsequent Ju 52s were built with three radial engines as the Ju 52/3m (drei motoren - “three engines”). Originally powered by three Pratt & Whitney Hornet radial engines, later production models mainly received 574 kW (770 hp) BMW 132 engines, a licence-built refinement of the Pratt & Whitney design. – Wikipedia

Reblogged from ww2aviation